DXC Cares: Building team players of the future

Matt UK Soccer

As you’ve seen from some of my recent posts, we here at DXC enjoy giving our time and talents to volunteer pursuits. In the coming months, I’m going to share my blog space with some of our great volunteers as part of a program we call DXC Cares.

First up is Matt Reynolds, a director in our UK region who has made a big difference in his community by coaching youth football. Here’s his story.


I have a lifelong passion for football (soccer). It’s a sport I’ve played, watched, admired and adored since I was old enough to stand and kick a ball.

As with many football coaches here in the UK, I got involved as my son was keen to play and learn the game. A familiar story in UK youth sports, probably world-wide, is there are too many players, too few teams and rarely enough volunteers.

I had been looking for a volunteering project or some form of charitable endeavor to put something back into a local community that gives my family and me so much. It was a no-brainer for me to get involved as I knew I would have great fun sharing my passion, knowledge and enthusiasm for the sport.  I therefore, happily offered my time and the rest – as they say, is history.

As a director at DXC, I felt I could manage the expectations of the parents and organise and motivate the team to play in the right way. And all while making the team a fun, engaging and safe place for the players to express themselves with a football at their feet.

Above all, I wanted the boys to make new friends, learn, laugh and be part of something they’d enjoy, value and remember for many years to come. I wanted them to always remember this team with the fondest of memories.

“Coach” is not always an easy role, as you must manage parent and player expectations, remain super positive throughout – even on a cold, wet and windy day in mid-winter – and commit your personal time.

So, why do I it and what do I get out of it?  I feel an enormous sense of pride and enjoyment in watching the boys develop into a team, watching them mature and bond while having great fun together. I enjoy shaping their football skills, thinking, teamwork and ethos as well as their communication skills.  I feel the lessons I’m teaching them will help them at school, at home and, ultimately, in life.

You’re never too young to learn how to become a great team player – nobody wins alone.

I’m their manager, friend, mentor, coach and, at times, their social worker. Overall, I aim to be a positive role model. It’s sad to say that not all boys come from an idealistic background. Some have less than stable homes, parents that can’t afford many luxuries in life, or they’ve been bullied at school or on previous teams. I enjoy nothing more than watching their confidence grow and their smile return.

I love what I do, I’m super-proud of our team, our club and our philosophy.  We have fun, we engage the boys and we provide a safe environment.  We also love to win football matches, but we’re only truly happy when we’ve won in the right way: playing with the right spirit and with a togetherness that all great teams have, no matter what the sport.

Most importantly we play with a smile on our faces and enjoy what we do.


Matt Reynolds is director of Security Solutioning, Solutioning & Commercial Functions at DXC in the UK.

DXC Cares recognizes our employee volunteers. Every day, DXC employees volunteer their time and talents to make a difference in people’s lives. Check out more DXC Cares stories on Facebook .

RELATED LINKS

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